C’EST vs IL EST

C’EST and CE SONT are followed by determined nouns  

Remember that nouns in French are preceded by a determiner.  Most French nouns are preceded by determiners which indicate number and gender.

👉Scroll to the bottom of this post to watch my lesson on C’EST vs IL EST👈


Look for “determiners” like:  un, une, de la, du, des, mon, ma, mes, ce, cette, etc.

Le chienThe dogC’est le chien de ma soeur.It’s my sister’s dog.
Une FrançaiseA French womanC’est une Française qui chante cette chanson.It’s a French woman who sings this song.
Mes affairesMy belongingsCe sont mes affaires que tu vois sur la table.It’s my belongings that you see on the table.

C’EST and CE SONT are followed by a proper noun or a disjunctive pronoun.

JenniferC’est Jennifer. C’est elle.It’s Jennifer. It’s her.
FrançoisC’est François. C’est lui.It’s François. It’s him.
Tristan et CharlotteCe sont Tristan et Charlotte. Ce sont eux.It’s Tristan and Charlotte. It’s them.

DISJUNCTIVE PRONOUNS

JEC’est MOI – It’s me
TEC’est TOI – It’s you
ILC’est LUI – It’s him
ELLEC’est ELLE – It’s her
NOUSC’est NOUS – It’s us
VOUSC’est VOUS – It’s you
ILSCe sont EUX – It’s them
ELLESCe sont ELLES – It’s them

C’EST and CE SONT are followed by dates

Mon anniversaire?My birthday?C’est le 23 mars.It’s March 23.
La fête?The party?C’est le week-end prochain.It’s next weekend.

C’EST and CE SONT are followed by adjectives for non-specific things, and the adjective will always be masculine and singular.

Comments in general, personal opinions, collective opinions

Descriptions of people and things in general

BeaubeautifulC’est beau!It’s beautiful!
ChaudhotC’est chaud!It’s hot.*note that this is not in reference to the weather which would be Il fait chaud.

IL / ELLE EST and ILS / ELLES SONT are followed by an adjective when you refer to a specific person or thing.

sympaniceElle est sympa.She is nice.
tristesadIl est triste.He is sad.
marrantfun / funnyIls sont marrants.They are fun / funny.
FrançaisFrenchIl est Français.He is French

IL / ELLE EST and ILS / ELLES SONT are followed by professions

*Note that in French you don’t need UN or UNE before a profession in French.

professeurteacherElle est professeur.She is a teacher.
médecindoctorIl est médecin.He is a doctor.
musicienmusicianIls sont musiciens.They are musicians.



Here’s what’s included in the full course:

Video tutorial – 5 minutes
Video support guide – PDF
Practice exercise – 27 sentences – multiple choice
Challenge exercise – 50 sentences – multiple choice
Challenge cards for printing – the same sentences as in the exercise
Challenge cards for online use – one per page – the same as in the exercise


French First Conditional «Si Clauses»

What is a si clause?

The word si  means if in English.  Si clauses, also known as conditionals or conditional sentences, are used to express what could happen if some condition is met.  Si clauses indicate possibilities which may or may not actually happen. They refer to the present, past, and future. 

Conditional sentences have two parts:  the condition, or si clause, and the result clause which indicates what will happen if the condition of the si clause is met.  The tense of the result clause depends on the tense of the si clause. In other words, the tense of the two clauses follow a pattern that cannot be modified.

👉Scroll to the bottom of this post to watch my lesson on 1st conditional French «si clauses»👈


Present + Present

LINK 👉Practice present + present si clauses on quizlet.

  • Si tu ne veux pas y aller, tu restes à la maison.
  • If you don’t want to go, you stay at the house. 
  • Si on a faim, on mange.
  • If we’re hungry, we eat.

Present + Future

LINK 👉Practice present + future si clauses on quizlet.

If you haven’t learned the futur simple yet, it is fine to use the futur proche.  You’ll see both in the examples.  The futur simple is more common.

  • Si tu parles français tous les jours, tu auras un meilleur niveau.
  • If you speak French every day, you will have a better level.
  • Si tu viens à la réunion avec moi, tu vas mieux comprendre.
  • If you come to the meeting with me, you are going to understand better.
  • Si tu viens à la réunion avec moi, tu comprendras mieux.
  • If you come to the meeting with me, you will understand better.

Present + Imperative (Commands)

LINK 👉Practice present + imperative si clauses on quizlet.

The result clause and the si clause can be reversed and that won’t make any difference.  Just make sure to use the present tense in the si clause. You can reverse the order of the clauses in any type of si clause, including when you want to use the imperative to give commands. 

  • Finis tes devoirs avant le dîner si tu peux.
  • Finish your homework before dinner if you can.
  • Si tu n’es pas trop fatigué(e), lis cet article ce soir.
  • If you’re not too tired, read this article tonight.

Si clauses with the passé composé

The si part must always be in the passé composé.  Here are the possible combinations of tenses:

Passé Composé + Present

LINK 👉Practice passé composé + present tense si clauses on quizlet.

This is kind of like the present / present construction.  It’s really not used that much, but I’ll show it to you anyway just so that you can have a little exposure to it and see some examples.

  • Si tu n’as pas fini tes devoirs, tu ne peux pas sortir.
  • If you haven’t finished your homework, you cannot go out.
  • Si tu as perdu ton emploi, tu ne peux pas partir en vacances. 
  • If you lost your job, you cannot go on vacation.

Passé Composé + Future

LINK 👉Practice passé composé + future tense si clauses on quizlet.
  • Si tu n’as pas pris tes gants, tu auras froid aux mains.
  • If you didn’t take your gloves, you will have cold hands.
  • Si tu n’as rien mangé ce matin, tu auras faim.
  • If you didn’t eat anything this morning,  you will be hungry.

Passé Composé + Imperative (Command)

LINK 👉Practice passé composé + imperative si clauses on quizlet.
  • Fais-moi savoir si tu n’as pas compris la leçon.
  • Let me know if you did not understand the lesson.
  • Si tu n’as pas encore vu le film, regarde-le avant d’en parler.
  • If you haven’t yet seen the movie, watch it before talking about it.



A1 Level Circling Activity – Practice and master regular French verbs in 3 tenses

Practice regular French verbs using this proven method

Circling is the instructional practice of asking a series of prescribed questions in the target language about a statement in the target language. Circling is used to provide students with contextualized repetitions of target structures. Research shows that language learners need between 70-150 repetitions of a structure in order to acquire it into their permanent vocabulary.

Scroll down to the bottom of this post to watch my video tutorial using this method at the A1 level


  • In this lesson, I will speak a sentence: Je garde mes petites soeurs tous les jours.
  • I will then tell you to restate the sentence using a different subject pronoun: Nous (for example)
  • You will then restate the sentence making necessary changes: Nous gardons nos petites soeurs tous les jours.

This lesson focuses on six regular French verbs, possessive adjectives, and other frequently used words that you will acquire through meaningful repetition. Each sentence is spoken in the present, passé composé, and futur proche tenses both with and without negation.



Included

  1. Full length downloadable video circling activity – 20 minutes
  2. Full length downloadable audio circling activity – 18 minutes
  3. Practice cards for online use to work on reading and writing – 108 cards

👉 Step 1: Watch the video lesson / activity to learn about the circling method. You will quickly catch on, and will truly need to concentrate so that you can make the necessary changes in your sentences. Does this ever happen to you when speaking French with someone? You can understand what’s being said, but you can’t think fast enough to make the necessary changes when responding? That’s exactly why you should try out circling!

👉 Step 2: Once you’ve watched the video and have done the exercise while reading along, try out the audio only version! This will be a challenge as you will not be able to see the words, and it will help with listening and speaking skills.

👉 Step 3: Use the set of cards to practice reading and writing. Read the card that I would have spoken to you in steps 1 and 2, and take the time to write your response before looking at the answer card. As the cards are not numbered, I encourage you to download them and use them online rather than printing.


French Dictée – B2 Level – Le Voyage

THEMELE VOYAGE
LEVELB2 – PRE-INTERMEDIATE
LENGTH240 – 260 WORDS
INSTRUCTIONSWrite exactly what you hear in the dictée.  I will read each sentence twice. Pause the video if you need more time to write.  

Useful vocabulary:
point = period; full stop
virgule = comma
point d’exclamation = exclamation mark
point d’interrogation = question mark
GRAMMARGrammar covered in this dictée:
Regular French verbs ending in ER, IR, and RE
Reflexive verbs
Futur simple
Conditional tense
Passé composé with avoir and être
Imperfect tense
Plus-que-parfait
Past conditional
Futur antérieur
Present subjunctive
Past subjunctive
2nd conditional SI CLAUSES
3rd conditional SI CLAUSES
Vouloir, pouvoir, devoir
Vouloir, pouvoir, devoir = Past conditional
Common irregular verbs
Causative faire construction
Relative pronouns: QUE – QUI – OÙ – DONT
Relative pronouns: CE QUE – CE QUI – CE DONT
Direct object pronouns + agreement in passé composé
Indirect object pronouns
Pronouns Y and EN
Double pronouns
Pronouns in affirmative commands

French Dictée – B1 Level – Le Voyage

THEMELE VOYAGE
LEVELB1 – PRE-INTERMEDIATE
LENGTH160 – 180 WORDS
INSTRUCTIONSWrite exactly what you hear in the dictée.  I will read each sentence twice. Pause the video if you need more time to write.  

Useful vocabulary:
point = period; full stop
virgule = comma
point d’exclamation = exclamation mark
point d’interrogation = question mark
GRAMMARGrammar covered in this dictée:
Regular French verbs ending in ER, IR, and RE
Reflexive verbs
Futur simple
Conditional tense
Passé composé with avoir and être
Imperfect tense
Plus-que-parfait
Past conditional
Present subjunctive
2nd conditional SI CLAUSES
3rd conditional SI CLAUSES
Vouloir, pouvoir, devoir
Common irregular verbs
Direct object pronouns + agreement in passé composé
Indirect object pronouns
Pronouns Y and EN
Double pronouns

French Dictée – A2 Level – Le Voyage

THEMELE VOYAGE
LEVELA2 – ELEMENTARY
LENGTH60 – 80 WORDS
INSTRUCTIONSWrite exactly what you hear in the dictée.  I will read each sentence twice. Pause the video if you need more time to write.  

Useful vocabulary:
point = period; full stop
virgule = comma
point d’exclamation = exclamation mark
point d’interrogation = question mark
GRAMMARGrammar covered in this dictée:
Regular French verbs ending in ER, IR, and RE
Present tense
Futur simple
Passé composé with avoir and être
Imperfect tense
First conditional SI CLAUSES
Vouloir, pouvoir, devoir
Common irregular verbs
Direct object pronouns
Indirect object pronouns
Pronouns Y and EN

Intermediate French Dictée Exercises

This is a set of upper-intermediate level dictées. 20 dictations are included in this resource by Jennifer @ LLL French Academy. Each exercise is an exchange between two people (both read by Jennifer). These dictées are 2 – 3 sentences in length. Many tenses are used as well as pronouns. Dictation exercises are an excellent way to improve your French listening and writing skills. Scroll down to try out a few sample dictations.

Included:

➯ Audio presentation of the dictées. Listen as I read each sentence two times slowly enough for you to understand and write at the same time.

➯ PDF of the numbered French sentences in the dictée and the English translation.



Sample Dictée 1

First, play the audio and write everything I say, then scroll down for the text written in French along with the English Translation

Sample Dictée 2

First, play the audio and write everything I say, then scroll down for the text written in French along with the English Translation


Corrigé: Sample Dictée 1

La vie en ville, j’en ai assez.  Je vais m’installer à la campagne.

City life, I’ve had enough.  I’m going to move to the countryside.

Mais tu n’as pas peur de t’embêter?

But aren’t you afraid of being bored?


Corrigé: Sample Dictée 2

Ma voiture a été emmenée par la police à la fourrière.

My car was impounded by the police.

Pourquoi?  Où est-ce que tu t’étais garé?

Why?  Where had you parked?



Regular French Verbs Ending in -DRE

Regular French Verbs Ending in -DRE 

A high percentage of verbs in French end in -DRE. These are for the most part regular verbs, and their conjugation in the present tense follows a set pattern; you just need to drop the -RE ending of the infinitive form of the verb (in English, the infinitive form is the verb preceded by the word ‘to’). The verb minus its ending is called the stem or radical.

Scroll down to the bottom of this post to watch my video lesson on regular -DRE verbs in the present, past, and future tenses.



Conjugating the verbs

In order to conjugate the verbs, you need to drop the -RE and replace it with the following endings:

Répondre (to respond / to reply / to answer)

Je répond + s

Tu répond + s

Il/elle/on répond + (nothing)

Nous répond + ons

Vous répond + ez

Ils/elles répond + ent


Attendre (to wait)

J’attend + s

Tu attend + s

Il/elle/on attend + (nothing)

Nous attend + ons

Vous attend + ez

Ils/elles attend + ent

Note: When verbs are conjugated in the present tense, they can be interpreted as either the continuous present (“ing” in English) or the simple present.

Examples:

Je réponds à un email. = I am replying to an email.

Il répond à tous ses emails = He replies to all of his emails.

Tu attends un ami = You are waiting for a friend.

J’attends toujours le bus à 5h00 = I always wait for the bus at 5:00..


Note: The verbs PRENDRE, APPRENDRE, and COMPRENDRE do not follow the same pattern as regular verbs ending in -IR.


A short list of common regular French -DRE verbs:

  • attendre – to wait for
  • défendre – to defend
  • dépendre – to depend on
  • descendre – to descend
  • entendre – to hear
  • étendre – to stretch
  • fondre – to melt
  • mordre – to bite
  • pendre – to hang, to suspend
  • perdre – to lose
  • rendre – to give back
  • répondre – to answer
  • vendre – to sell



Want to know more about my regular French verbs audio drill?

Practice is what it takes when learning verb conjugations. This audio recorded drill (native speaker) will help you learn regular French -ER, -IR and -RE verbs in the present tense. This is a verb drill of 100 common regular French verbs that you can use at any time to improve your skills, pronunciation and speed when conjugating.

Example:

👉FINIR – TO FINISH – JE – 5 seconds to say or write answer before recorded response – JE FINIS

👉ATTENDRE – TO WAIT – TU – 5 seconds to say or write answer before recorded response – TU ATTENDS

👉VENDRE – TO SELL – IL – 5 seconds to say or write answer before recorded response – IL VEND

👉ABOLIR – TO ABOLISH – NOUS – 5 seconds to say or write answer before recorded response – NOUS ABOLISSONS

👉MANGER – TO EAT – VOUS – 5 seconds to say or write answer before recorded response – VOUS MANGEZ

👉RÉUSSIR – TO SUCCEED – ILS – 5 seconds to say or write answer before recorded response – ILS RÉUSSISSENT

During the recording the verbs are not numbered so that you can easily choose a group of 10 or 15 at any point during the exercise to use as a quick review whether you’re at home, in the car on a road trip, or on a plane headed for Paris!

Included:

👉20 minute mp3 audio recording of 100 regular French verbs in the present tense.
👉Answer sheet
👉Student response sheet


Regular French Verbs Ending in -IR

Regular French Verbs Ending in -IR 

A high percentage of verbs in French end in -IR. These are for the most part regular verbs, and their conjugation in the present tense follows a set pattern; you just need to drop the -IR ending of the infinitive form of the verb (in English, the infinitive form is the verb preceded by the word ‘to’). The verb minus its ending is called the stem or radical.

Scroll down to the bottom of this post to watch my video lesson on regular -IR verbs in the present, past, and future tenses.



Conjugating the verbs

In order to conjugate the verbs, you need to drop the -IR and replace it with the following endings:

Finir (to finish)

Je fin + is

Tu fin + is

Il/elle/on fin + it

Nous fin + issons

Vous fin + issez

Ils/elles fin + issent


Choisir (to choose)

Je chois + is

Tu chois + is

Il/elle/on chois + it

Nous chois + issons

Vous chois + issez

Ils/elles chois + issent

Note: When verbs are conjugated in the present tense, they can be interpreted as either the continuous present (“ing” in English) or the simple present.

Examples:

Je finis ce projet = I am finishing my project.

Il finit tôt = He finishes early.

Tu choisis un cadeau = You are choosing a gift.

Je choisis de vivre en France = I choose to live in France. *Find out why DE comes after CHOISIS*


A short list of common regular French -IR verbs:

  • accueillir – to welcome
  • accomplir – to accomplish
  • avertir – to warn
  • bâtir – to build
  • choisir – to choose
  • désobéir – to disobey
  • embellir – to make beautiful
  • envahir – to invade
  • établir – to establish
  • finir – to finish
  • grandir – to grow up
  • grossir – to gain weight
  • guérir – to cure
  • investir – to invest
  • maigrir – to lose weight
  • nourrir – to feed
  • obéir – to obey
  • punir – to punish
  • ralentir – to slow down
  • réfléchir – to reflect
  • remplir – to fill
  • réunir – to reunite
  • réussir – to succeed
  • rougir – to blush
  • vieillir – to grow old



Want to know more about my regular French verbs audio drill?

Practice is what it takes when learning verb conjugations. This audio recorded drill (native speaker) will help you learn regular French -ER, -IR and -RE verbs in the present tense. This is a verb drill of 100 common regular French verbs that you can use at any time to improve your skills, pronunciation and speed when conjugating.

Example:

👉FINIR – TO FINISH – JE – 5 seconds to say or write answer before recorded response – JE FINIS

👉ATTENDRE – TO WAIT – TU – 5 seconds to say or write answer before recorded response – TU ATTENDS

👉VENDRE – TO SELL – IL – 5 seconds to say or write answer before recorded response – IL VEND

👉ABOLIR – TO ABOLISH – NOUS – 5 seconds to say or write answer before recorded response – NOUS ABOLISSONS

👉MANGER – TO EAT – VOUS – 5 seconds to say or write answer before recorded response – VOUS MANGEZ

👉RÉUSSIR – TO SUCCEED – ILS – 5 seconds to say or write answer before recorded response – ILS RÉUSSISSENT

During the recording the verbs are not numbered so that you can easily choose a group of 10 or 15 at any point during the exercise to use as a quick review whether you’re at home, in the car on a road trip, or on a plane headed for Paris!

Included:

👉20 minute mp3 audio recording of 100 regular French verbs in the present tense.
👉Answer sheet
👉Student response sheet


Regular French Verbs Ending in -ER

Regular French Verbs Ending in -ER 

A very high percentage of verbs in French end in -ER. These are for the most part regular verbs, and their conjugation in the present tense follows a set pattern; you just need to drop the -ER ending of the infinitive form of the verb (in English, the infinitive form is the verb preceded by the word ‘to’). The verb minus its ending is called the stem or radical.

Scroll down to the bottom of this post to watch my video lesson on regular -ER verbs in the present, past, and future tenses.


Conjugating the verbs

In order to conjugate the verbs, you need to drop the -ER and replace it by the following endings:

Aimer (to like/ to love)

J’aim + e

Tu aim + es

Il/elle/on aim + e

Nous aim + ons

Vous aim + ez

Ils/elles aim + ent


Demander (to ask)

Je demand + e

Tu demand + es

Il/elle/on demand + e

Nous demand + ons

Vous demand + ez

Ils/elles demand + ent

Note: When verbs are conjugated in the present tense, they can be interpreted as either the continuous present (“ing” in English) or the simple present.

Examples:

Je travaille sur ce projet = I’m working on this project.

Il travaille chez BMW = He works for BMW.

Tu manges de la soupe = You’re eating soup.

Je mange des plats épicés = I eat spicy foods.

Nous parlons avec Carla = We are speaking with Carla.

Je parle trois langues = I speak three languages.

Note: If there is a second verb following the main verb in the sentence, you only need to conjugate the first one and leave the second one in its infinitive form.

Examples:

J’aime parler à ma fille = I like talking/to talk to my daughter.

Il préfère manger des fruits = He prefers eating/to eat fruits.

A short list of common -ER verbs:

arriver – to arrive

chanter – to sing 

adorer – to love/to adore

detester – to hate 

chercher – to look for 

donner – to give

étudier – to study 

jouer – to play

jardiner – to garden

acheter – to buy 

échanger – to exchange 

penser – to think

garder – to keep 

emprunter – to borrow 

prêter – to loan

travailler – to work 

trouver – to find 

voyager – to travel 

parler – to speak/to talk 

regarder – to look/to watch/to watch for

rêver – to dream

dépenser – to spend money

payer – to pay

préférer – to prefer 

appeler – to call

habiter – to live 

casser – to break 

marcher – to walk 

changer – to change 

écouter – to listen to 

commencer – to start

terminer – to finish

aider – to help

continuer – to continue

rentrer – to enter/return home

gagner – to earn money, to win 

coûter – to cost

cuisiner – to cook

amener – to bring, to take someone

déménager – to move

 préparer – to prepare

essayer – to try 

There are a few spelling differences for certain -ER verbs:

Manger (to eat) and other verbs that end in ger (voyager, déménager, nager) are conjugated a bit differently in the nous form: An extra E is added for pronunciation purposes.

Je mang + e

Tu mang + es

Il/elle/on mang + e

Nous mang + eons

Vous mang + ez

Ils/elles mang + ent

Verbs like préférer that end in érer have an accent change in every conjugation except for the nous and vous forms.

Je préfère

Tu préfères

Il/elle/on préfère

Nous préférons

Vous préférez

Ils/elles préfèrent

The verbs amener, acheter, appeler and other verbs that end in e + single consonant + er require an added accent, or in the case of appeler, a doubling of the consonant in every conjugation except the nous and vous forms.

J’amène (achète) (appelle)

Tu amènes (achètes) (appelles)

Il/elle/on amène (achète) (appelle)

Nous amenons (achetons) (appelons)

Vous amenez (achetez) (appelez)Ils/elles amènent (achètent) (appellent)





Want to know more about my regular French verbs audio drill?

Practice is what it takes when learning verb conjugations. This audio recorded drill (native speaker) will help you learn regular French -ER, -IR and -RE verbs in the present tense. This is a verb drill of 100 common regular French verbs that you can use at any time to improve your skills, pronunciation and speed when conjugating.

Example:

👉FINIR – TO FINISH – JE – 5 seconds to say or write answer before recorded response – JE FINIS

👉ATTENDRE – TO WAIT – TU – 5 seconds to say or write answer before recorded response – TU ATTENDS

👉VENDRE – TO SELL – IL – 5 seconds to say or write answer before recorded response – IL VEND

👉ABOLIR – TO ABOLISH – NOUS – 5 seconds to say or write answer before recorded response – NOUS ABOLISSONS

👉MANGER – TO EAT – VOUS – 5 seconds to say or write answer before recorded response – VOUS MANGEZ

👉RÉUSSIR – TO SUCCEED – ILS – 5 seconds to say or write answer before recorded response – ILS RÉUSSISSENT

During the recording the verbs are not numbered so that you can easily choose a group of 10 or 15 at any point during the exercise to use as a quick review whether you’re at home, in the car on a road trip, or on a plane headed for Paris!

Included:

👉20 minute mp3 audio recording of 100 regular French verbs in the present tense.
👉Answer sheet
👉Student response sheet