30 Useful French Adverbs

Watch my video lesson below to learn how to form adverbs in French, then learn this list of French adverbs and you’ll really enrich your vocabulary. Everything you say will sound better, and YOU will sound more French!

👉Scroll down to watch my comprehensive video lesson on how to compare using adverbs 👈

Click here for a similar list of 40 useful French adjectives

1clairementclearly
2rapidementquickly
3bienwell
4mieuxbetter
5fréquemmentfrequently
6polimentpolitely
7courammentfluently
8brillammentbrilliantly
9malbadly
10vitefast
11honnêtementhonestly
12souventoften
13lentementslowly
14doucementsoftly
15heureusementfortunately
16malheureusementunfortunately
17franchementfrankly
18absolumentabsolutely
19vraimentreally
20récemmentrecently
21suffisammentsufficiently
22méchammentspitefully
23précisémentprecisely
24profondémentdeeply
25énormémentenormously
26sûrementsurely
27calmementcalmly
28prudemmentcarefully
29effectivementindeed
30habituellementusually

There are also many short, common adverbs that are used all the time. Here’s a complete lesson on common adverbs and where to place them in a sentence. Learn more about them in the following video lesson.

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Advanced French Connecting Words

Advanced French Connecting Words

As you become a more advanced learner of French you will find yourself needing connecting words or linking words to help make your point and seamlessly transition from one sentence to another.  These French connecting words will enrich your vocabulary,  speaking, and writing skills. ​

SINONotherwise

Fais tes devoirs, sinon tu vas rater ton examen.

Do your homework, otherwise you are going to fail your exam.

EN REVANCHEon the other hand; then again

Je ne sais pas parler chinois.  En revanche, je parle couramment le français!

I don’t know how to speak Chinese.  On the other hand, I speak French fluently!

PAR CONTREon the other hand; however

Tu n’aimes pas les champignons.  Moi, par contre, je les adore.

You don’t like mushrooms.  I, however, love them.

DE TOUTE FAÇONanyway; anyhow

De toute façon, on se verra ce week-end.

Anyway, we’ll see each other this weekend.

D’AILLEURSincidentally; by the way

Tu n’as pas fait le dîner.  D’ailleurs, tu n’as même pas fait les courses.

You didn’t make dinner.  Incidentally, you didn’t even go grocery shopping.

NÉANMOINSnevertheless

Nous n’avons pas envie de déménager.  Néanmoins, il faut le faire.

We don’t feel like moving house.  Nevertheless, we have to do it.

EN FAITin fact; actually

En fait, ce que tu dis est faux.

Actually, what you’re saying is wrong.

AU FAITby the way; now that I think about it

Au fait, j’aime beaucoup ton parfum.

By the way, I really like your perfume.

PUISQUEsince; because; as

Puisque c’est comme ça, je ne viendrai pas ce soir.

Since it’s like that, I won’t come tonight.

C’EST-À-DIRE – that is; in other words

Je suis professeur de français, c’est-à-dire j’enseigne la langue française.

I am a French teacher, in other words I teach the French language.

EN EFFETindeed

En effet, je voudrais bien y aller avec toi.

Indeed, I would like to go (there) with you.

JUSTEMENTexactly; precisely; actually; as it happens

C’est justement ce que je te disais.

That’s precisely what I was telling you.

ACTUELLEMENTcurrently; at the moment

Actuellement je travaille pour mon père.

At the moment I’m working for my father.

À LA FOISat the same time; at once

Je fais à la fois une soupe aux poireaux et du pain.

I’m making leek soup and bread at the same time.

SUBITEMENT suddenly; abruptly

Mon oncle est décédé subitement l’année dernière.

My uncle died suddenly last year.

FINALEMENTafter all; in the end; at the end of the day

Finalement, j’ai décidé de croire son histoire.

In the end, I decided to believe his story.

POURTANTyet; however

On nous a servi du champagne, et pourtant nous n’avions pas prévu de rester.

They served us champagne yet we had not planned on staying.

ENFINfinally; at long last

Enfin ils se sont mariés.

They finally got married.

EN PLUSthen; on top of that

On a très bien mangé dans ce restaurant, et en plus le propriétaire est très aimable.

We ate very well at this restaurant, and on top of that the owner is very friendly.


Level B2: French Connecting Words

As you become a more advanced learner of French you will find yourself needing connecting words or linking words to help make your point and seamlessly transition from one sentence to another. These French connecting words will enrich your vocabulary, speaking, and writing skills.

➯ STEP 1: Lesson guide – Download your list of 20 French connecting words. See the words in French with English translations, then read the example sentences for each word also in French with English translations.

➯ STEP 2:  Download and complete five exercises in short paragraph form. Fill in the blanks with connecting words that are provided in a word bank. For each exercise, don’t use any word more than once. Answer keys are provided. 



French Verb FAIRE – 11 Tenses

FAIRE – TO DO – TO MAKE

Learn the French Verb FAIRE – 11 Tenses using this handy chart.

Present

je faisnous faisons
tu faisvous faites
il – elle – on faitils – elles font

Passé Composé

j’ai faitnous avons fait
tu as faitvous avez fait
il – elle – on a faitils – elles ont fait

Imperative

——————————————–Faisons !
Fais !Faites !
——————————————–——————————————-

Imperfect

je faisaisnous faisions
tu faisaisvous faisiez
il – elle – on faisaitils – elles faisaient

Simple Future

je ferainous ferons
tu ferasvous ferez
il – elle – on ferails – elles feront

Conditional

je feraisnous ferions
tu feraisvous feriez
il – elle – on feraitils – elles feraient

Plus-que-Parfait

j’avais faitnous avions fait
tu avais faitvous aviez fait
il – elle – on avait faitils – elles avaient fait

Past Conditional

j’aurais faitnous aurions fait
tu aurais faitvous auriez fait
il – elle – on aurait faitils – elles auraient fait

Future Perfect

j’aurai faitnous aurons fait
tu auras faitvous aurez fait
il – elle – on aura faitils – elles auront fait

Subjunctive

que je fasseque nous fassions
que tu fassesque vous fassiez
qu’il – qu’elle – qu’on fassequ’ils – qu’elles fassent

Past Subjunctive

que j’aie faitque nous ayons fait
que tu aies faitque vous ayez fait
qu’il – qu’elle – qu’on ait faitqu’ils- qu’elles aient fait
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French schools: 10 Interesting Facts

1. Going to school is required by French law

French parents have all used this threat against their growing kids in case they start voicing that they would love to just stay at home and skip school. It is of course the same in the USA where school is mandatory in all states.

2. Old methods die hard in French schools

There are changes taking place but the “Éducation Nationale” is a very rigid and slow moving entity. Teachers are still seen giving grades in front of the whole class or having students copy lines for punishment.

3. Math is king in French schools

Selection in high school is based on math and science. In France, the best students are considered to be those who can perform well in math, physics…

4. French schools are secular

It is a mandated law that no one can wear any religious sign when attending a public school. This has created controversy at times, like when France banned Muslim scarves from schools a couple of years back.

5. Teacher centered education

This goes with #2. French schools and classrooms are very centered around the teacher providing education to the children and having to cover a curriculum mandated by the government. By experience I can also say that younger teachers are being taught with more modern methods and are guiding students better.

6. Long school days

Kids usually start at around 8 or 8:30 and end their day around 5:00pm. Most students now go to school on Wednesday mornings (not afternoons).

7. Lots of vacation

The school calendar is nicely interrupted about every six or seven weeks by a two-week break. French students enjoy All Saints vacation, Christmas break, Winter break and Easter break. All of these weeks come in addition to two months off in the summer.

8. Two hour lunch break

Of course, you could have guessed that in France students get 2 hours for lunch! School cafeterias usually offer very decent choices. Students do not bring their lunch to school, but many do go back home for lunch.

9. French schools are free

Public schools are free. Parents have to pay for school supplies, but the poorest can also get help for that. This dates back to the 19th century and thanks to Jules Ferry who created the “éducation laïque gratuite et obligatoire”. (free mandatory secular education)

10. Languages

Kids usually start learning English and another language in 6th grade. However, in private schools English and other language classes are often offered at a younger age. France has a lot of bilingual schools, mostly English but also in Occitan or Catalan which preserves local heritage.


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40 Useful French Adjectives

How to compare using French adjectives

Watch my video lesson below to learn how to compare using adjectives in French, then learn this list of French adjectives and you’ll really enrich your vocabulary. Everything you say will sound better, and YOU will sound more French!

👉Scroll down to watch my lesson on how to compare using adjectives 👈

👉 Practice and master these adjectives with a Quizlet study set 👈

1bon – bonnegood
2mauvais – mauvaisebad
3joli – joliepretty
4gentil – gentillenice
5fort – fortestrong
6drôle – drôlefunny
7bizarreodd
8effrayé – effrayéescared
9fâché – fâchéeangry
10cher – chèreexpensive
11courageux – courageusebrave
12désorienté – désorientéeconfused
13difficiledifficult
14facileeasy
15épuisé – épuiséeexhausted
16fatigué – fatiguéetired
17gravetotally (slang)
18gros – grossefat; heavy
19impossibleimpossible
20justefair
21librefree – available
22meilleur – meilleurebetter
23mocheugly
24navré – navréesorry
25pareil – pareillethe same
26pauvrepoor
27pressé – presséein a hurry
28prêt – prêteready
29ravi – raviedelighted
30simpleuncomplicated
31sympanice
32tranquillecalm
33travailleur – travailleusehardworking
34tristesad
35videempty
36vieux – vieilleold
37méchant – méchantemean
38inquiet – inquièteworried
39haut – hautehigh
40bas – basselow

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French Teacher Resources


French Pronouns Top Ten Questions

Simplifying French Pronouns

1.Question:  How can you tell the difference between a DIRECT OBJECT
and an INDIRECT OBJECT?

Answer:  DIRECT OBJECTS answer the questions WHO? WHAT? QUI? QUOI?
Answer:  INDIRECT OBJECTS answer the questions TO WHOM? FOR WHOM?
À QUI / POUR QUI?
2.Question:  What are some common verbs that are followed by À and
that take an indirect object?

Answer:  Here are some common ones.  Notice that many of these verbs
do NOT need an indirect object in English.

acheter à / pour
to buy for
J’achète des cadeaux pour mes amis.
I’m buying presents for my friends.
Je leur achète des cadeaux.
I’m buying them some presents.

emprunter à
to borrow from
J’emprunte de l’argent à mon ami.
I’m borrowing money from my friend.
Je lui emprunte de l’argent.
I’m borrowing money from him.

prêter à
to loan to
Je prête ma voiture à mon frère.
I’m loaning my car to my brother.
Je lui prête ma voiture.
I’m loaning him my car.

offrir à
to give / to offer to
J’offre des fleurs à ma copine.
I’m giving flowers to my girlfriend.
Je lui offre des fleurs.
I’m giving her flowers.

rendre à
to return something to
Je rends son livre à Pierre.
I’m giving Pierre his book back.
Je lui rends son livre.
I’m giving him back his book.

donner à
to give to
Je donne à manger aux enfants.
I’m feeding the children.
Je leur donne à manger.
I’m feeding them.

vendre à
to sell to
Je vends des biscuits aux enseignants.
I’m selling cookies to the teachers.
Je leur vends des biscuits.
I’m selling them cookies.

parler à
to speak to
Je parle à mon père.
I’m speaking to my father.
Je lui parle. 
I’m speaking to him.

demander à
to ask
Je demande la permission à mon professeur.
I’m asking my teacher’s permission.
Je lui demande la permission.
I’m asking for her permission.

dire à
to say to
Je dis oui à mon fiancé.
I’m saying yes to my fiance.
Je lui dis oui.
I’m telling him yes.

téléphoner à
to call on the phone
Je téléphone aux contributeurs.
I’m calling the contributors.
Je leur téléphone.
I’m calling them.

écrire à
to write to
J’écris une lettre à ma grand-mère.
I’m writing a letter to my grandmother.
Je lui écris une lettre.
I’m writing her a letter.

sourire à
to smile at
Je souris aux étudiants.
I’m smiling at the students.
Je leur souris.
I’m smiling at them.

répondre à
to reply to
Je réponds à Julie.
I’m replying to Julie.
Je lui réponds.
I’m replying to her.

souhaiter à
to wish to
Je souhaite de Joyeuses Fêtes aux voisins.
I’m wishing the neighbors Happy Holidays.
Je leur souhaite de Joyeuses Fêtes.
I’m wishing them Happy Holidays.

envoyer à
to send to
J’envoie un courriel à ma copine.
I’m sending an email to my friend.
Je lui envoie un courriel.
I’m sending her an email.

laisser à
to leave something to / for
Je laisse des devoirs à mes élèves.
I’m leaving homework for my students.
Je leur laisse des devoirs. 
I’m leaving them homework.

présenter à
to introduce to
Je présente mon fiancé à mes parents.
I’m introducing my fiance to my parents.
Je leur présente mon fiancé.
I’m introducing my fiance to them.

servir à
to serve to
Je sers de l’eau aux jardiniers.
I’m serving the gardeners some water.
Je leur sers de l’eau.
I’m serving them some water.

raconter à
to tell a story to
Je raconte une histoire aux enfants.
I’m telling the children a story.
Je leur raconte une histoire. 
I’m telling them a story.
3.
Question:  Is LUI both masculine and feminine when used as
an indirect object pronoun or are there exceptions to the rule?

Answer:  When used as an indirect object pronoun LUI can
mean HIM or HER and there are no exceptions.
4.
Question:  How can you know if ME, TE, NOUS and VOUS are
reflexive, direct or indirect pronouns?

Answer:  REFLEXIVE:  Look at the subject of the sentence. 
If the pronoun indicates that the subject is doing something
to himself it is reflexive.

Answer:  DIRECT or INDIRECT?  If the subject of the sentence
indicates that someone is doing something to someone or
something else it may be DIRECT or INDIRECT. 

Here’s how to tell the difference:

Does the pronoun answer WHO or WHAT?  It is DIRECT.
Does the pronoun answer TO WHOM or FOR WHOM?  It is INDIRECT.
This is why it is a good idea to know which verbs must be followed by À (see # 2).
5.
Question:  What is the order to follow when using more
than one pronoun in a sentence?

Answer:

ME – TE – NOUS – VOUS
followed by
LE – LA – LES
followed by
LUI – LEUR
followed by
Y
followed by
EN
6.
Question:  What is the order of pronouns in affirmative
commands?

Answer:

LE – LA – LES
followed by
MOI – TOI – LUI
followed by
NOUS – VOUS – LEUR
followed by
Y
followed by
EN
7.
Question:  What is the BODY PART rule with reflexive verbs?

Answer:  BODY PART RULE: Don’t make agreement between
the subject and past participle when using reflexive verbs
if the past participle is followed by a direct object (a body part).

Example:  Elle s’est lavé les mains.
Even though ÊTRE is the helping verb you don’t need to
make agreement.  
8.
Question:  Concerning the BODY PART RULE, what if the body
part becomes a direct object pronoun?  Do I then make agreement?

Answer:  Yes.  In that case the direct object (body part) will fall
before the past participle and you must make agreement. 
Note that you’re making agreement with the direct object and
not with the subject of the sentence.

Example:  Elle se les est lavées
9.
Question:  Is there an easy trick to help remember when to
use French pronouns?

Answer:  Easy?  Probably not, but I’ll try!

ME
Someone does something to me or for me

TE
Someone does something to you or for you

NOUS
Someone does something to us or for us

VOUS
Someone does something to you or for you

LE
Means HIM or IT if the object is singular and masculine
Don’t use LE when someone does something TO or FOR a person

LA
Means HER or IT if the object is singular and feminine
Don’t use LA when someone does something TO or FOR a person

LES
Means THEM whether you’re talking about people, animals or things, masculine or feminine. 
Don’t use LES when someone does something to people or animals.

LUI
Means HIM or HER, can refer to people or animals.
Use LUI when someone is doing something TO or FOR someone.

LEUR
Means THEM, masculine or feminine people or animals.
Use LEUR when someone is doing something TO or FOR someone.

Y
Means THERE or IT, can refer to places or things (not people).
Use Y when you have a PREPOSITION followed by a place or thing.
Don’t use Y when the preceding PREPOSITION is any form of DE.

EN
Means SOME (OF THEM), ANY or ONE
Use EN in the following situations:
DE LA, DU, DES, DE L’, DE, D’ + noun
ANY NUMBER (including UN – UNE) + noun
EXPRESSIONS OF QUANTITY + DE + noun
10.
Question:  I thought LUI could only be masculine.

Answer:  When LUI is used as an indirect object pronoun it
means HIM or HER.

When LUI is used as a stressed pronoun it means HIM and
ELLE means HER.



How to use the pronoun EN in French

The French pronoun EN replaces a QUANTITY

EN refers to a noun that is introduced by:
De / de la / du / des / d’ / un, une or any other number
Expressions of quantity like:  un verre de / un kilo de / une bouteille de..
Adverbs of quantity like:  beaucoup de / peu de / assez de…
EN is normally translated by “some”, “any”  or “one” in English.
Many times we don’t need to say “some” or “of them” in English,
but you can’t avoid it in French. 
That’s why you need this pronoun.
CLICK HERE FOR A LESSON ON THE FRENCH PRONOUN Y

👉Scroll down to watch my comprehensive video lesson on the French pronoun EN and a supplementary lesson on both Y and EN 👈



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Examples

In these examples the pronoun EN replaces a QUANTITY.

Nous voudrions 2 baguettes.

We would like 2 baguettes.
Nous en voudrions 2.

We would like 2 of them.

*Note that the EN comes right before the verb in the present tense.

*Note that the number needs to be repeated.
Je ne mange pas de frites.

I’m not eating any fries.
Je n’en mange pas.

I’m not eating any of them.

*Note the placement of ne / pas when using the pronoun EN.

*Note that the form of “de” that introduces the noun also gets replaced.
Tu vas servir du champagne?

Are you going to serve champagne?
Tu vas en servir?

Are you going to serve some of that?

*Note that when you have an infinitive in the sentence
the EN comes right before it.
Vous achetiez beaucoup de citrons?

Were you buying a lot of lemons?
Vous en achetiez beaucoup?

Were you buying a lot of them?

*Note that even when using another tense like the imperfect the EN comes right before the  verb.

*Note that you have to repeat the word beaucoup or any other adverb of quantity.
J’ai bu 8 verres d’eau. 

I drank 8 glasses of water.
J’en ai bu 8 verres.

I drank 8 glasses of it.

*Note that in the passé composé the EN
comes right before the helping verb.

*Note that you have to repeat the quantity
and the expression of quantity.
Il n’a pas voulu de poulet.

He didn’t want any chicken.
Il n’en a pas voulu.

He didn’t want any of it.

*Note the placement of ne / pas when using
EN with negation in the passé composé.

The French pronoun EN replaces a THING

EN replaces a THING that has been introduced by a verb and that is preceded by: 

de / de la / du / des / d’
Many French verbs are followed by the preposition DE
Here are just a few of the most common French verbs followed by DE: (here’s a more complete list)

Avoir peur de quelque chose  / to be afraid of something
J’ai peur des serpents.
J’en ai peur.

Avoir besoin de quelque chose / to need something 
Tu as besoin d’argent?
Tu en as besoin?

Avoir envie de quelque chose / to desire or want something 
Il a envie de manger une pizza.
Il en a envie.

Avoir l’intention de quelque chose / to have the intention of doing something 
Nous avons l’intention de partir en vacances.
Nous en avons l’intention.

S’excuser de faire quelque chose / to excuse oneself for doing something
Vous vous excusez d’arriver en retard.
Vous vous en excusez.

Rêver de faire quelque chose  / to dream of doing something
Elles rêvent de faire le tour du monde.
Elles en rêvent.

Se souvenir de faire quelque chose / to remember something
Je me souviens de ce restaurant.
Je m’en souviens.

Profiter de faire quelque chose / to take advantage of something
Tu profites de tes vacances.
Tu en profites.

Se servir de quelque chose / to use something
Elle se sert de ma voiture.
Elle s’en sert.

French Pronouns Y and EN

This lesson @ LLL French Academy is for you if you find yourself confused as to how and when you should use the French pronouns Y and EN, and you’ll learn how to do all of this in three tenses (negation included).

Included:

  1. Downloadable video lesson on the pronouns Y and EN.
  2. 6 page lesson guide with rules, examples, and quick tips.
  3. 3 online multiple choice quizzes
  4. 75 practice cards with answer key

Step 1: Watch the video grammar lesson about the pronouns Y and EN. Even if you don’t really know what they are in English (or if they even exist in English), by the end of this lesson you’ll have a much better understanding. Before you watch the lesson, be sure to download your 6 page lesson guide where you’ll find all of the rules and examples given in the lesson. You’ll even get a few helpful hints, and it will be a handy guide to add to your study resources.

Step 2: You will have three online multiple choice quizzes to take. Each quiz has ten questions, and they are in three different tenses: present tense, passé composé, and futur proche. These quizzes will help you out a lot before moving on to the 75 practice cards.

Step 3: Now it’s time to really challenge yourself. I’m including a set of 75 practice cards (no multiple choice answers) to challenge you in 3 tenses (and with negation)! Don’t worry, an answer key is included so that you can easily check your work. I’m including a paper free version that you can open up on your device as well as a version with 4 cards per page that you can print and cut out in case you enjoy being away from the screen sometimes. You’ll be able to use this resource anywhere to truly master the French pronouns Y and EN.


How to use the pronoun Y in French

The French pronoun Y replaces a PLACE 

Here are two examples to get started.  You’ve probably seen these and wondered why the Y is there.

  • On y va  – Let’s go (there)
  • Il y a – There is / There are

CLICK HERE FOR A LESSON ON THE PRONOUN “EN”

👉Scroll down to watch my comprehensive video lesson on the French pronoun Y 👈



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Y refers to a previously mentioned or implied place.
*Y is not used to replace a person. 
To replace people you need to use an indirect object pronoun:  me, te, lui, nous, vous, leur
Y is normally translated by “there” in English. 
Many times we don’t need to say “there” in English, but you can’t avoid it in French. 
That’s why you need this pronoun.
Y usually replaces a prepositional phrase beginning with a preposition of location like à, chez , dans, sur, etc .
Y replaces a preposition (other than any form of «de») + a place or a thing.

Examples

In these examples the pronoun Y means THERE.

Are you going to the bank today?

No, I’m going (there) tomorrow.
Tu vas à la banque aujourd’hui ? 

Non, j’y vais demain.

*note that the Y comes right before the verb in the present tense.
She’s not going to the mall. 

She’s not going (there).
Elle ne va pas au centre commercial. 

Elle n’y va pas. 

*note the placement of ne / pas when using the pronoun Y.
We’re going to the store.

Do you want to go (there)?
Nous allons au magasin.

Tu veux y aller ?

*note that when you have an infinitive in the sentence the Y comes right before it.
He was at Jean’s house.

He was there.
Il était chez Jean.

Il y était.

*note that even when using another tense like the imperfect the Y comes right before the  verb.
They waited in front of the restaurant. 

They waited (there).
Ils ont attendu devant le restaurant. 

Ils y ont attendu. 

*note that in the passé composé the Y comes right before the helping verb
I didn’t put the cards on the table. 

I didn’t put them there.
Je n’ai pas mis les cartes sur la table. 

Je n’y ai pas mis les cartes.

*note the placement of ne / pas when using Y with negation in the passé composé.

The French pronoun Y replaces a THING

Y refers to a previously mentioned or implied thing when that thing is preceded by À, AU, À LA, AUX, À L’

*This can be confusing because you will be tempted to replace a thing by a direct object pronoun.

Use direct object pronouns when the thing is not preceded by À.
Many verbs in French are followed by the preposition À, and it is with these verbs that you will often need to use the pronoun Y. 
Here are just a few of the most common French verbs followed by À: (find more here)

Penser à something (like an idea)
Je pense à ton idée.J’y pense.

Réfléchir à something (like a problem)
Tu réfléchis au problème? Tu y réfléchis?

Arriver à faire something (like homework)
Il arrive à faire ses devoirs. Il y arrive.

S’habituer à something (like living in France)
Je m’habitue à vivre en France. Je m’y habitue.

Réussir à faire something (like understanding)
Je réussis à comprendre ce qu’il me dit. J’y réussis.

S’intéresser à something (like history)
Nous nous intéressons à l’histoire. Nous nous y intéressons.

Répondre à something (like an email)
Vous répondez à son email. Vous y répondez.

More examples

In these examples the pronoun Y means IT.

I’m responding to a letter.
I’m responding (to it).
Je réponds à une lettre.
J’y réponds.
He’s thinking about our trip.
He’s thinking about it.
Il pense à notre voyage. 
Il y pense.
You have to obey the law.
You have to obey it.
Tu dois obéir à la loi.
Tu dois y obéir.
Yes, I attended the meeting.
Yes, I attended (it).
Oui, j’ai assisté à la réunion.
Oui, j’y ai assisté.
I’m going to think about your proposal.
I’m going to think about it.
Je vais réfléchir à votre proposition.
Je vais y réfléchir.

French Pronouns Y and EN

This lesson @ LLL French Academy is for you if you find yourself confused as to how and when you should use the French pronouns Y and EN, and you’ll learn how to do all of this in three tenses (negation included).

Included:

  1. Downloadable video lesson on the pronouns Y and EN.
  2. 6 page lesson guide with rules, examples, and quick tips.
  3. 3 online multiple choice quizzes
  4. 75 practice cards with answer key

Step 1: Watch the video grammar lesson about the pronouns Y and EN. Even if you don’t really know what they are in English (or if they even exist in English), by the end of this lesson you’ll have a much better understanding. Before you watch the lesson, be sure to download your 6 page lesson guide where you’ll find all of the rules and examples given in the lesson. You’ll even get a few helpful hints, and it will be a handy guide to add to your study resources.

Step 2: You will have three online multiple choice quizzes to take. Each quiz has ten questions, and they are in three different tenses: present tense, passé composé, and futur proche. These quizzes will help you out a lot before moving on to the 75 practice cards.

Step 3: Now it’s time to really challenge yourself. I’m including a set of 75 practice cards (no multiple choice answers) to challenge you in 3 tenses (and with negation)! Don’t worry, an answer key is included so that you can easily check your work. I’m including a paper free version that you can open up on your device as well as a version with 4 cards per page that you can print and cut out in case you enjoy being away from the screen sometimes. You’ll be able to use this resource anywhere to truly master the French pronouns Y and EN.


List of French Verbs Followed by the Preposition DE + NOUN

French verbs followed by DE + NOUN

These verbs must be followed by DE when they are used before a NOUN whether it be a thing or a person.  There are other verbs that need DE, but here are some of the most common ones.  It will not be helpful to translate from English to French because many times we don’t need a preposition in English.  Unfortunately, you will have to memorize this list.  

When you sign up for my full course, you get examples in French and English for all of the following verbs as well as lots of exercises and practice cards to help you master your new French grammar skill! You’ll also learn which verbs require à or de when followed by nouns.

Unlock a PDF list, examples for every verb in French and English, 100 practice cards, and a test to practice and master your new French grammar skill when you become my patron.

avoir besoin de quelque chose / quelqu’un
to need something / someone
avoir peur de 
to be afraid of something / someone
avoir envie de
to feel like something
changer de quelque chose
to change something
être responsable de quelqu’un
to be responsible for someone
jouer de quelque chose (instrument)
to play an instrument
parler de quelque chose / quelqu’un
to talk about something / someone
penser de quelque chose / quelqu’un
to ask an opinion about something / someone
s’approcher de quelque chose / quelqu’un
to approach something / someone
s’apercevoir de quelque chose
to notice something
se méfier de quelque chose / quelqu’un
to beware of something / someone
se moquer de quelqu’un
to make fun of someone
s’occuper de quelque chose / quelqu’un
to take care of something / someone
se rappeler de quelqu’un / quelque chose
to remember someone / something
se rendre compte de quelque chose
to realize something / to become aware of something
se servir de quelque chose
to use something
se souvenir de quelqu’un / quelque chose
to remember someone / something 

B1 LEVEL: FRENCH VERBS FOLLOWED BY INFINITIVES OR NOUNS

Certain French verbs must be followed by DE, À, or NOTHING when an infinitive comes next. Some verbs require À or DE when followed by nouns. This lesson expands upon the list of common verbs you learned in my free A2 level lesson, and it includes examples for every verb in French with English translations. The examples are written at a B1-B2 level.

This is not a lesson that can really be explained as there is no rhyme or reason as to whether you need prepositions or not. I thought the best thing to do would be to provide you with comprehensive lists and practice resources. It will not be helpful to translate from English to French because many times we don’t need prepositions in English even though they’re essential in French. The best thing to do is work on memorizing these lists.

TRÈS IMPORTANT: Unlike my level A2 lesson, this is a course about verbs when followed both by infinitives as well as nounsIt is important to revise verbs followed by nouns to help you remember when to use the pronouns Y and EN as well as the relative pronoun DONT.


STEP 1:  Verbs + no preposition + infinitive

Download the list without examples and keep it as a reference.

Download and study the list with examples in French and English.

Highlight the verbs and infinitives as you read the sentences aloud.

STEP 2:  Verbs + À + infinitive

Download the list without examples and keep it as a reference.

Download and study the list with examples in French and English.

Highlight the verbs and infinitives as you read the sentences aloud.

STEP 3:  Verbs + DE + infinitive

Download the list without examples and keep it as a reference.

Download and study the list with examples in French and English.

Highlight the verbs and infinitives as you read the sentences aloud.

STEP 4:  Verbs + À + noun

Download the list without examples and keep it as a reference.

Download and study the list with examples in French and English.

Highlight the verbs and nouns as you read the sentences aloud.

STEP 5:  Verbs + DE + noun

Download the list without examples and keep it as a reference.

Download and study the list with examples in French and English.

Highlight the verbs and nouns as you read the sentences aloud.

STEP 6:  100 practice cards

Fill in the blanks with À, DE, or NOTHING at all with verbs followed by infinitives and nouns. There are even some surprise cards which include other ways to use these difficult prepositions!

STEP 7:  Test yourself

After having spent time using your practice cards…. It’s time to test yourself! Download your test and see how you do. The sentences are the same as the ones on the practice cards, so don’t begin this final step until you feel you’re ready for the challenge! An answer key is provided.

Other lists to master @ LLL BLOG:

👉
Verbs + NO PREPOSITION + Infinitives 

👉Verbs + À + Infinitives 

👉Verbs + DE + Infinitives 

👉Verbs + À + Nouns 

👉Verbs + DE + Nouns 


List of French Verbs Followed by the Preposition À + NOUN

French verbs followed by À + NOUN

These verbs must be followed by À when they are used before a NOUN whether it be a thing or a person.  There are other verbs that need À, but here are some of the most common ones.  It will not be helpful to translate from English to French because many times we don’t need a preposition in English.  Unfortunately, you will have to memorize this list.  

When you sign up for my full course, you get examples in French and English for all of the following verbs as well as lots of exercises and practice cards to help you master your new French grammar skill! You’ll also learn which verbs require à or de when followed by nouns.

Unlock a PDF list, examples for every verb in French and English, 100 practice cards, and a test to practice and master your new French grammar skill when you become my patron.

acheter quelque chose à quelqu’un
to buy something from / for someone
assister à quelque chose
to attend something 
conseiller à quelqu’un
to advise someone
demander à quelqu’un
to ask someone
défendre à quelqu’un
to forbid someone
désobéir à quelqu’un
to disobey someone
dire à quelqu’un
to say to someone
donner à quelqu’un
to give to someone
écrire à quelqu’un
to write to someone
emprunter à quelqu’un
to borrow from someone
faire attention à quelqu’un
to pay attention to someone
to be careful with someone
interdire à quelqu’un
to forbid someone
jouer à quelque chose (jeu / sport)
to play a game / sport
lire à quelqu’un
to read to someone
obéir à quelqu’un
to obey someone
offrir à quelqu’un
to offer / to give to someone
pardonner à quelqu’un
to forgive someone
parler à quelqu’un
to speak to someone
penser à quelqu’un
to think about someone
permettre à quelqu’un
to allow someone
plaire à quelqu’un
to please someone
promettre à quelqu’un
to promise someone
proposer à quelqu’un
to suggest to someone
réfléchir à quelque chose
to consider / think about something
répondre à quelqu’un
to answer someone
ressembler à quelqu’un
to look like someone
rêver à quelque chose
to dream about something
serrer la main à quelqu’un
to shake hands with someone
suggérer à quelqu’un
to suggest to someone
s’habituer à quelque chose / quelqu’un
to get used to something / someone
s’intéresser à quelque chose / quelqu’un
to be interested in something / someone
téléphoner à quelqu’un
to call someone 
tenir à quelque chose
to stick to something
to be attached to something
voler (quelque chose) à quelqu’un
to steal something from someone*Rather than saying “à Jean-Paul”, for example, it sounds better to use the indirect object pronoun LUI. 

B1 LEVEL: FRENCH VERBS FOLLOWED BY INFINITIVES OR NOUNS

Certain French verbs must be followed by DE, À, or NOTHING when an infinitive comes next. Some verbs require À or DE when followed by nouns. This lesson expands upon the list of common verbs you learned in my free A2 level lesson, and it includes examples for every verb in French with English translations. The examples are written at a B1-B2 level.

This is not a lesson that can really be explained as there is no rhyme or reason as to whether you need prepositions or not. I thought the best thing to do would be to provide you with comprehensive lists and practice resources. It will not be helpful to translate from English to French because many times we don’t need prepositions in English even though they’re essential in French. The best thing to do is work on memorizing these lists.

TRÈS IMPORTANT: Unlike my level A2 lesson, this is a course about verbs when followed both by infinitives as well as nounsIt is important to revise verbs followed by nouns to help you remember when to use the pronouns Y and EN as well as the relative pronoun DONT.


STEP 1:  Verbs + no preposition + infinitive

Download the list without examples and keep it as a reference.

Download and study the list with examples in French and English.

Highlight the verbs and infinitives as you read the sentences aloud.

STEP 2:  Verbs + À + infinitive

Download the list without examples and keep it as a reference.

Download and study the list with examples in French and English.

Highlight the verbs and infinitives as you read the sentences aloud.

STEP 3:  Verbs + DE + infinitive

Download the list without examples and keep it as a reference.

Download and study the list with examples in French and English.

Highlight the verbs and infinitives as you read the sentences aloud.

STEP 4:  Verbs + À + noun

Download the list without examples and keep it as a reference.

Download and study the list with examples in French and English.

Highlight the verbs and nouns as you read the sentences aloud.

STEP 5:  Verbs + DE + noun

Download the list without examples and keep it as a reference.

Download and study the list with examples in French and English.

Highlight the verbs and nouns as you read the sentences aloud.

STEP 6:  100 practice cards

Fill in the blanks with À, DE, or NOTHING at all with verbs followed by infinitives and nouns. There are even some surprise cards which include other ways to use these difficult prepositions!

STEP 7:  Test yourself

After having spent time using your practice cards…. It’s time to test yourself! Download your test and see how you do. The sentences are the same as the ones on the practice cards, so don’t begin this final step until you feel you’re ready for the challenge! An answer key is provided.

Other lists to master @ LLL BLOG:

👉
Verbs + NO PREPOSITION + Infinitives 

👉Verbs + À + Infinitives 

👉Verbs + DE + Infinitives 

👉Verbs + À + Nouns 

👉Verbs + DE + Nouns