An/Année – Jour/Journée – Soir/Soirée – Matin/Matinée

🎥 Scroll down to watch my comprehensive video lesson on how to use these words 🎥 It can be difficult to know when use which of these words, and how to make the right choice.   MASCULINE FEMININE a day un jour une journée an evening un soir une soirée a morning un matin une matinéeContinue reading “An/Année – Jour/Journée – Soir/Soirée – Matin/Matinée”

How to use the pronoun EN in French

The French pronoun EN replaces a QUANTITY EN refers to a noun that has been introduced by: 👉 De – de la – du – des – d’ – un – une, or any other number👉 Expressions of quantity like:  un verre de / un kilo de / une bouteille de..👉 Adverbs of quantity like: Continue reading “How to use the pronoun EN in French”

Obliger à / Obligé(e) de

OBLIGER À + INFINITIF (verbe): Contraindre ou lier (quelqu’un) par une obligation morale, légale. To compel or bind (somebody) by a moral, legal obligation. When obliger is used as a verb, it is often followed by an infinitive. In this case, use the preposition à after the verb. 👉 On nous oblige à faire desContinue reading “Obliger à / Obligé(e) de”

Je suis confus(e) – Common Mistake in French

How not to say I’m confused in French Don’t make this common mistake… In English, we often say I’m confused or I’m so confused. It could be tempting translate in French as “Je suis confus(e)”, but that would be a big mistake, and you likely would not be understood. Observe the following translations of JeContinue reading “Je suis confus(e) – Common Mistake in French”

“Venir de” with the Imperfect Tense – French Recent Past

Le Passé Récent VENIR DE (IMPERFECT TENSE) + INFINITIVE When referring to something that happened before a moment in the past, venir is conjugated in the imperfect tense. It means that someone or something had just done something. It’s important not to confuse this grammatical structure with the plus-que-parfait tense, which means that someone hadContinue reading ““Venir de” with the Imperfect Tense – French Recent Past”

Venir de – French Recent Past

Le Passé Récent VENIR DE (PRESENT) + INFINITIVE When referring to something that happened just before the present moment, the verb venir is conjugated in the present, followed by de and an infinitive. It means that someone or something has just done something. You can also use venir in the imperfect tense to say thatContinue reading “Venir de – French Recent Past”

Exercise – Depuis, Pendant, Il y a

Go straight to the lesson: Depuis, Pendant, Il y a Fill in the blanks with depuis, pendant or il y a. Scroll down to see the answers and English translations. 1. J’étudie le français _________________ deux ans.2. J’ai habité à Genève avec mon mari _________________ trois ans.3. Ils se sont rencontrés à la fac _________________Continue reading “Exercise – Depuis, Pendant, Il y a”

Exercise: French Pronouns Y and EN

EXERCICE – Y ou EN? Respond to the following questions replacing the noun with Y or EN. Scroll down for the answers.Exemple : Est-ce que tu vas à Chicago demain ? Oui, j’y vais. 1. Est-ce que tu veux une bouteille d’eau ? Oui, _________________________.2. Tu vas en France cette année ? Non, _________________________.3. Est-ce que vousContinue reading “Exercise: French Pronouns Y and EN”

French Opposites – Antonyms

Practice and master these French antonyms in my course. You must be logged in to your LLL French Academy account to access this course and everything that is included. French Antonyms – Mots Opposés Learning opposite words is a fantastic way to increase your French vocabulary! I recommend learning them in pairs.   Practice pronunciationContinue reading “French Opposites – Antonyms”

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