French Direct and Indirect Object Pronouns – Top Ten Tips and Rules




When learning French, you quickly come to understand that pronouns are extremely important. In particular, direct and indirect object pronouns are crucial to master.

They are always the first set of pronouns that I teach, and here are three reasons why:

1.  They shorten your sentences: Using object pronouns allows you to avoid repeating the same noun over and over again in a sentence, which makes your French sound much more natural.

2.  They help you communicate more precisely: Object pronouns allow you to specify exactly who or what is the object of your sentence. This can be especially important in French, where word order is not as flexible as it is in English.

3.  They are used all the time: Direct and indirect object pronouns are used in virtually every French conversation, so if you want to be able to speak French fluently, you absolutely need to learn how to use them.

How do you identify direct and indirect objects in French?

A direct object is the noun that receives the action of the verb directly. For example, in the sentence “Je regarde la télévision” (I am watching (the) television), “la télévision” is the direct object because it is the thing being watched.

An indirect object is the noun that receives the action of the verb indirectly, often in the form of a benefit or harm. For example, in the sentence “Je donne un livre à mon ami” (I give a book to my friend), “mon ami” is the indirect object because he is the one receiving the book.

Follow the links below to watch my YouTube video lesson on direct and indirect object pronouns, take my free quiz, observe some sentence structure charts, and then use my set of 75 challenge cards to practice and solidify everything you learn in the lesson. 

Scroll down for my top rules and tips for using direct and indirect object pronouns!






TOP 5 RULES FOR USING DIRECT OBJECT PRONOUNS:

1.  The French direct object pronouns are “me,” “te,” “le/la,” “nous,” “vous,” and “les.”

2.  The pronoun comes before the verb in the present tense, before the helping verb in the passé composé, and before the infinitive in the futur proche.

3.  If the direct object is feminine and starts with a vowel or silent “h,” use “l’ ” instead of “la.”

4.  If the direct object is plural, use “les.”

5.  If the verb is negative, the pronoun comes between “ne” and the verb, and “pas” comes after the verb. For example, “Je ne le mange pas.” (I don’t eat it).


TOP 5 RULES FOR USING INDIRECT OBJECT PRONOUNS:

1.  The French indirect object pronouns are “me,” “te,” “lui,” “nous,” “vous,” and “leur.”

2.  Like direct object pronouns, the pronoun comes before the verb in the present tense, before the helping verb in the passé composé, and before the infinitive in the futur proche.

3.  “Lui” is used for both masculine and feminine singular indirect objects.

4.  If the indirect object is plural, use “leur.”

5.  When the verb is negative, use “ne” before the pronoun and “pas” after the verb. For example, “Je ne lui donne pas le livre.” (I’m not giving him/her the book).


Download the latest version of my Scope and Sequence to guide you through my French Course for Self-Learners


%d bloggers like this: